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Housing FAQs

Questions and Answers About Navy Housing

PLEASE NOTE:  Each installation and individual situation are unique, and some of the answers to questions below may vary between installations.  Also, all installations may not offer the same services listed in the FAQs.  For more specific and complete information contact the individual installation Housing Service Center.

Can’t find the answer to your question?  Contact your local Navy Housing Service Center (HSC) or email us at NavyHousingHQ@navy.mil

 

Assignment Priority FAQs

Q:  If I apply for housing using the Housing Early Assistance Tool (HEAT), does the date I submit my application become my control date?

A:  No.  HEAT does not change existing policy for determining your control date.

 

Q:  I am the sponsor of an Exception Family Member (EMF) registered in the EFMP.  Is special consideration given to this circumstance for my control date?

A: Possibly.  Family members designated as Categories IV and V EFMs are severely disabled, and Navy Housing strives to provide permanency in living arrangements.  As a result, EFM Categories IV and V are placed directly below the freeze zone. When two or more members are waiting for assignment, the higher of the EFM categories will be given priority in assignment.  If members are designated in the same EFM Category, the actual control date will determine the priority of assignment unless written notification is provided by the medical authority indicating unique circumstances.

 

Q:  My ship is making a change of homeport.  What is my control date?

A: The control date will be the earlier of either:

  • The date the dependents move to the new homeport and apply for housing after official announcement of the homeport change, or
  • The effective date of homeport change

If you are assigned to the new homeport after the official announcement of the homeport change, but prior to the actual change, your control date will be based on the date of detachment from the last permanent duty station.

 

Q:  I am assigned to a Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU)/Detachment (PCD).  What is my control date?

A: For Family Housing assignment at the ultimate homeport of the ship, the control date will be as follows: 

  • Personnel assigned to the PCU - The control date will be the date Navy Housing receives your application, after the official naval message from the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) is released designating the ship’s homeport
  • Personnel assigned to the PCD - The control date will be the date Navy Housing receives your application, or the date of the official naval message from the CNO is released designating the ship’s homeport, whichever is later

 

Q:  I am coming from an involuntary unaccompanied tour to an accompanied tour.  Is special consideration given to this circumstance for my control date?

A. Yes. The control date for members returning PCS from an involuntary unaccompanied tour, or from assignment to ships operating in specifically designated areas to an accompanied PCS tour will be the date of detachment from the prior accompanied PCS tour.

 

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Eligibility FAQs

Q:  What types of family housing are available?

A: There are three types of housing available to families:

  • Public/Private Venture (PPV) Housing is also referred to as privatized housing in the Navy. The Navy partnered with different private management companies to provide housing to service members. These companies are responsible for the construction, renovation, maintenance and day-to-day management of the housing.  PPV housing may be located on or off government property and in most cases will be former military housing.
  • Government Owned (also known as Military Housing or Navy Managed Housing is what was formerly thought of when we thought about on-base housing. While only available in limited quantities CONUS, Government Owned Housing is still widely available OCONUS.
  •  Community Housing is any housing that a service member may choose that is not PPV or government operated. This is housing outside of the base that is privately owned and operated. 

 

Q:  Where can I find an application and other documents required for housing? 

A: The documents, including the Housing Application, can be found on the Navy Housing website www.cnic.navy.mil/housingpolicyandforms. These include the Housing Application, Sexual Offender Form,dependent certification, custody or divorce papers and a copy of your orders.

 

Q:  What housing allowances am I eligible for?

A: Military members are entitled to various allowances to ensure the transition to a new location is as smooth and stress-free as possible. For information about your allowances, visit the Defense Travel Management Office website.If you have any questions, contact the local Housing Service Center.

 

Q:  I am in the military, and so is my spouse.  How does that impact my housing eligibility?

A: Either you or your spouse may be assigned to a Navy Housing (government owned or managed) or privatized/PPV family housing unit when co-located or accompanied by a dependent.  When co-located, the housing assignment will be based upon the senior service member’s eligibility.  If an officer is married to an enlisted member, assignment will be made to officer housing. If you and your spouse have dependents and are assigned to separate installations not in the same geographic area (within 1.5 hour commute time), whoever has physical custody of the dependents will be eligible for family housing.  If you and your spouse do not have dependents and are assigned to separate installations, not in the same geographic area, both of you are eligible for unaccompanied housing.  If no unaccompanied housing is available, you each will be eligible for a housing allowance at the "without dependent rate."

 

Q:  I am single/divorced and have custody of a child. Am I entitled to family housing?

A:  Service members who are entitled to a housing allowance at the “with dependent rate” must have legal and physical custody of a child who lives with them at least six consecutive months of the year. 

 

 

Q:  We have a large, blended family. Some of our children live with us full-time, others do not. How do we know the size of house we are eligible for? What if the size we are eligible for will not be sufficient when all of the children are with us?

A:  Navy policy outlines the general bedroom availability for families. In general, a child 6 years of age or older should not share a bedroom with a child of the opposite sex. A child 10 years of age or older is eligible for a separate bedroom and should not be required to share a bedroom. The conditions in the policy apply to children that are qualified as dependents and where inventory permits. To be considered a dependent, the child must live with you for more than 6 months. Please contact your local HSC to discuss your specific situation.

 

 

Q:  Retired Disabled Veterans allowed to live in on-base housing?

       A:  Housing is privatized in most CONUS locations. Based on occupancy and business agreements for each area, they may allow retired military to live in privatized housing. You can find contact information for the privatized housing at each installation online at: www.militaryhomestoday.com.

 

Q:  I am a federal civilian being moved to a new installation.  Can I live in privatized housing?

A:  Maybe.  First priority is always given to qualified active duty military members.  Contact the local Housing Service Center, they can provide you with up-to-date information regarding the availability of privatized housing in the area, wait times for privatized homes and housing eligibility criteria.  They will also be able to assist you with other housing alternatives if privatized housing is not a viable option for you at this time.  

 

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Fair Housing FAQs

Q:  What specifically constitutes discrimination in housing?

A:  Discrimination is an act, policy, or procedure that arbitrarily denies equal treatment in housing because of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability, or familial status (including children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under the age of 18) to an individual or a group of individuals.

 

 

Q:  I found an apartment online that was available, and when I disclosed that I was a military member the property manager said the property is no longer available.  Is this discrimination?

A:  Maybe.  Military members are not a protected class under the Federal Fair Housing Act; however, there may be state or local laws that provide protections.  Please visit your local Navy Housing Service Center (HSC) or Navy Legal Service Office (NLSO) to discuss your situation.

 

Q:  Can I file a housing discrimination complaint with HUD?

A:  Yes and your local Navy Housing Service Center (HSC) can help.  HUD’s Housing Discrimination website provides contact information as well as an online form.

 

Q:  What if the housing discrimination act occurred overseas?

A:  In foreign countries, the intent of the prohibitions against discrimination shall be carried out to the extent possible within the laws and customs of the country. Upon the receipt of information on suspected discriminatory acts, the Commanding Officer will consult with the Staff Judge Advocate to determine if the laws of the country prohibit this discrimination and take investigative action, as appropriate.

 

Q:  What should I do if my discrimination complaint does not violate federal law but may violate state or local laws?

A:  Many states or local jurisdictions have enacted housing discrimination laws that include factors other than those listed in Federal law or DoD/Navy policy. When a complaint is received that violates a state or local law, but not Federal law, DoD or Navy policy, the HSC does not have the authority to investigate the complaint. However, the Housing Counselor will provide the complainant with contact information for the appropriate state and local offices that will investigate and process the complaint.

 

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Finding Housing FAQs

Q:  We are currently dissatisfied with our housing and are trying to find other alternatives.  Our lease ends soon; how can we find different housing?

A:  Your best resource for all types of housing, including local community housing, is your Housing Service Center. They will be able to assist you with all your housing needs.  Make sure to ask about the Rental Partnership Program and other cost-saving programs in your area.  

Q:  I received my orders to PCS.  What steps should I take to find housing right away?

A:  You can contact the Navy Housing Service Center (HSC) at the location where you will be reporting and someone will help you find housing.  You can start the housing application process online through the Housing Early Assistance Tool (HEAT).


Miscellaneous FAQs

Q:  What is Navy Housing's pet policy?

A:  The pet policy is set at each individual installation based on local conditions, restrictions/prohibitions,  and requirements.  Please contact your local Housing Service Center (HSC) before moving your pet to ensure a smooth move to your new installation.

Q:   Q. My spouse is about to enter A school. Is my spouse required to live in unaccompanied housing? If I live in the community, will we receive BAH?

A:  In general, students are typically required to be housed in unaccompanied housing for the duration of A school and are not eligible for BAH. Contact your spouse’s command for specific information.

Q:  Are there jobs available in Navy Housing?

A:  Navy Housing posts all job opportunities on USAJobs.

Q:  How do I make reservations at the NGIS?

A:  Information on Navy Gateway Inns and Suites (NGIS) can be found at https://ngis.dodlodging.net.  You can also call 1-877-NAVY-BED or 011-973-1785-2100 or DSN 318-439-3372.  

Q:  How can I find the Total Workforce Management Services website?

A:  You can find the TWMS website at: http://twms.navy.mil/selfservice/login.asp

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Privatized Housing FAQs

Q: My family and I are planning on moving into privatized or Government housing. Can we have a live-in aide or nanny?

A: There is no instruction that directly authorizes a live-in nanny. CNICINST 11103.5 CH-1 Navy Housing Eligibility, Assignment and Termination Criteria states in Enclosure 2, number 2 c.(5): If the inventory is available and when a live-in aide or nanny is approved by the CO of the Installation, they will be eligible for a separate bedroom.

Q:  Where can I find floor plans and photos of military and privatized housing?

A: Please visit the Navy Housing Pinterest page for a comprehensive inventory of photos and floor plans across the Navy enterprise. Our privatized housing partners' websites also contain photos and floor plans.  Find your local privatized housing at www.militaryhomestoday.com.  Your local Housing Service Center may have more photos and floor plans available to send.  

 

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Rental Partnership Program (RPP) Service Member FAQs

Q:  Does RPP help me save money?

A:  The RPP offers real cost savings to Service members living in the community. The RPP homes that are available have already been screened and inspected by the local Navy Housing Service Center (HSC). The program guarantees the Service member reduced rates and reduced or no security deposit and administrative fees.  Also, RPP requires rent be paid by allotment or electronic funds transfer, making it one less bill you have to think about every month.

 

Q:  What is RPP Housing?

A:  The RPP is designed to provide military personnel, enlisted and officers, with affordable off-base housing. This program is governed by an agreement between Landlords and the local Installation Commanding Officer (CO) or Housing Installation Program Manager (HIPM).  

This program exists to ease the transition for our Service members relocating under orders and to help defray some of the costs incurred with moving. Service members receive reduced rental costs, pay reduced or no security deposit and application fees. If state or local laws allow the use of surety bonds, they can be used to satisfy this requirement. Credit checks are minimal as applicants are approved based on End of Active Obligated Service (EAOS), Projected Rotation Date (PRD) and drawing Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) or Overseas Housing Allowance (OHA).  Applicants must have permanent orders to the area.

This program permits Landlords to voluntarily set-aside apartments, houses or townhouses for rent to military personnel. Housing units which are offered to the RPP are evaluated and qualified to meet the Navy’s minimum standards.

Q:  Will I have to pay additional fees or a security deposit on RPP Housing?

A:  There are no administrative fees associated with RPP Housing. However, the Landlord may charge a reservation fee of up to $250 to hold a housing unit. The reservation fee will be applied towards the first month’s rent. If the Service member does not qualify, the fee will be returned. If the Service member qualifies but decides not to take the rental, the reservation fee will be forfeited.

 

Q:  Can a Landlord change the rent based on a Service member’s rank?

A:  No, there is an established RPP rate that is not based on rank.

 

Q:  I have poor credit; can I still use RPP?

A:  Yes, you can still participate in the RPP. No one can be denied because of credit history.

 

Q:  I have a pet; will I be required to pay additional pet deposits or other associated fees?

A:  RPP does not dictate Landlord pet policy. Individual Landlords may require additional pet fees.

 

Q:  Am I eligible for housing in the RPP?

A:  All active-duty Service members are eligible, either accompanied or unaccompanied, with a minimum of 180 days remaining prior to EAOS and PRD.

 

Q:  How do I get approved for RPP?

A:  The Service member must provide orders and Leave and Earnings Statement (LES) to the Housing Service Center (HSC). The Service member must have a minimum of 180 days remaining prior to EAOS and PRD. The Service member must complete a counseling session in person or over the phone with the HSC. When counseling has been completed, the Service member will receive a letter of eligibility, which is presented to the Landlord, authorizing participation in the RPP.

 

Q:  I am currently in a lease; when can I get into RPP?

A:  It is up to the Landlord to release a member from their current lease to participate in this program. The Service member can participate in the RPP at the end of the original lease term by signing a new lease. If the Service member decides to participate in the RPP, the Landlord must refund the difference in security deposit within 30 days. Rent would be the negotiated RPP rate.

 

Q:  Can I enter into an RPP lease with roommates?

A:  Service members may enter into an RPP lease with roommates. All Service member roommates must complete the RPP Addendum. Additionally, each Service member must complete all RPP Requirements and be aware of their rights and responsibilities under the Service Members Civil Relief Act (SCRA).

 

Q:  Are RPP properties inspected?

A:  All RPP properties have been inspected for adherence to program requirements by the Housing Service Center (HSC). Additionally, the Service member and Landlord are responsible for doing a move-in and move-out inspection. Contact your HSC for information and inspection forms: www.cnic.navy.mil/housingquickreference.

 

Q:  How do I pay rent?

A:  The Service member must initiate rent payment by allotment or electronic funds transfer via the personal support division, the Landlord or their banking institution.

 

Q:  What happens after my lease expires?

A:  After the initial term of the lease has expired, the Service member may continue under the Rental Partnership Program on a month-to-month basis or may sign a new lease.

 

Q:  What happens if I receive orders during my lease?

A:  If the Service member receives orders in excess of 90 days and is transferred from his current permanent duty station (per the SCRA guidelines), the Service member may terminate the lease before the end of the lease period under the military clause. The Service member must present a copy of their orders to the Landlord along with a 30 day written notice.

 

Q:  What happens if I break my lease outside of the SCRA?

A:  A Service member is bound by the lease and provisions and all other types of termination apply.

 

Q:  What if I have a problem with the Landlord or property?

A:  The Service member may contact the Housing Service Center (HSC) directly if they are having difficulty resolving a problem with the RPP lease, RPP property or other Landlord/tenant dispute. The HSC will perform Issue Resolution Services as an independent third party.  Additionally, the HSC will monitor the number of valid complaints related to a Landlord. In the event, a Landlord receives three valid complaints that are not corrected in a timely manner the Landlord will be removed from RPP.

 

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Rental Partnership Program (RPP) Landlord FAQs

Q:  What are the benefits for the Landlord when participating in RPP?

A:  The Landlord can expect:

  • Expanded marketing listing of RPP properties given to Service members, etc.) of the property by the Housing Service Center (HSC).
  • Applicants must have permanent orders for the minimum negotiated lease period at the arriving duty station.
  • Rent must be paid by allotment or eft..
  • Eligibility for housing verified through the HSC.

 

Q:  What is RPP Housing?

A:  The RPP is designed to provide military personnel, enlisted and officers, with affordable off-base housing. This program is governed by an agreement between the Landlord and the local Installation Commanding Officer (CO) or Housing Installation Program Manager (HIPM). 

This program exists to ease the transition for our military personnel relocating under orders and to help defray some of the costs incurred with moving. Service members receive reduced rental costs, pay reduced or no security deposit and administrative fees. Credit checks are minimal as applicants are approved based on End of Active Obligated Service (EAOS), Projected Rotation Date (PRD) and drawing Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) or Overseas Housing Allowance (OHA). Applicants must have permanent orders to the area.

This program permits communities to voluntarily obligate apartments, houses or townhouses for rent to military personnel. Housing units which are offered to the RPP are evaluated and qualified to meet the Navy’s minimum standards by the HSC.

 

Q:  How does the Landlord collect rent?

A:  The Service member must initiate rent payment by allotment or efteft.

 

Q:  Can a Landlord change the rent based on a Service member’s rank?

A:  No, there is an established RPP rate that is not based on rank.

 

Q:  When can a Landlord refuse to rent to a Service member?

A:  Service members can be turned down if a bad reference has been received from a previous Landlord. They cannot be turned down for poor credit.

 

Q:  Are RPP properties inspected?

A:  All RPP properties must be inspected for adherence to program requirements by the local HSC. Additionally, the Service member and Landlord are responsible for doing a move-in and move-out inspection. For apartment complexes, the HSC will inspect one unit of each type/size as well as inspect all common areas including clubhouse, play areas and grounds. If it is a single family unit, the HSC will walk through the entire home and property.

 

Q:  What happens if the property fails to meet the RPP Inspection Criteria?

A:  If the property initially fails the inspection or has been found to have deficiencies, the Landlord has the opportunity to fix any problems. Once the problems have been fixed, the Landlord can reschedule an inspection. If the property passed the re-inspection and other requirements, it would be added to the RPP program. If it fails on first inspection, it will be reinspected within 30 days. If a second inspection fails, the Landlord must wait six months to reapply for the program.

 

Q:  What happens after the lease expires?

A:  At the end of the initial lease period, the Service member can extend on a month-to-month basis or can opt to sign a new extended lease (state and local laws may supersede mutual agreement). The Service member may terminate the lease with Permanent Change of Station (PCS) orders, deployment for more than 90 days, retirement, discharge or a mutual agreement between the Service member and the Landlord. In the case of PCS orders or deployment, an official letter or copy of orders must be presented along with a 30 day written notice (or notification timeframe specified in applicable local, state and Federal law).

 

Q:  What happens if the Service member receives orders during their lease?

A:  If the Service member receives orders in excess of 90 days and is transferred from his current permanent duty station (per the Service Members Civil Release Act), the Service member may terminate the lease before the end of the lease period under the military clause. The Service member must present a copy of their orders to the Landlord along with a 30 day written notice.

 

Q:  What if the Landlord has a complaint with the Service member?

A:  The Landlord may contact the HSC directly if they are having difficulty resolving a problem with the RPP lease, RPP property or other Landlord/tenant dispute. The HSC will perform Issue Resolution Services as an independent third party.

 

Q:  What is the process to evict a Service member?

A:  Evictions are at the discretion of the Landlord. All state/local laws must be adhered to, and the HSC must be notified of any pending evictions. Upon notice, the HSC will perform Issue Resolution Services as an independent third party.

 

Q:  What if the Service member leaves owing money?

A:  Should the Service member leave owing money, the Landlord can present to the HSC an itemized list of charges owed to the Landlord. This list must contain a final total and the Landlord’s signature. The HSC will assist the Landlord by forwarding documentation to the Service member’s Command. Per paragraph 2.b of the MILPERSMAN, the extent to which Installation Commanding Officers may cooperate with creditors is limited to administrative referral of correspondence to the Service member. If the Service member is separating from the service and leaves owing money it will be up to the complex to use their normal collection procedure, using state and local laws.

The Landlord is not covered by the Fair Debt Collection Practice Act unless he/she turns the debt over to a third party debt collector. If debt is turned over to a third party debt collector, the debt collector is not allowed to contact the Navy and the debt will not be forwarded to the Command unless the Landlord receives a judgment against the Service member in state court. If the judgment is received and then forwarded to the Navy, the matter will be referred to the Service member (or his/her Command) who may then be counseled on the ramifications of failure to pay just debts.

 

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Unaccompanied Housing FAQs

 

 

Q: I currently live in unaccompanied housing and will be deployed. Do I have to vacate my room while I am deployed? If so, will the Navy store my belongings while I am deployed?

A: If your deployment is expected to last more than 90 days, CNIC policy typically requires you to vacate your room. Exceptions may be allowed by written resident request and Housing Authority approval. If you are required to move out of the barracks while deployed, your Command is responsible for storage of your household goods.

 

 

Wait List FAQs

 

Q:  What is the Family Housing wait list based upon?

A: The master wait list for Family Housing is based on Service member rank and bedroom requirement.  Where local housing areas are designated for separation of officers and enlisted personnel, separate wait lists are maintained.  Dependent upon the location, Housing may have additional wait lists to encompass specific housing areas, style of units, pet restricted areas, pay-grades, etc. 

 

Q:  When will I be placed on the Housing wait list?

A:  Much of our housing does not have a wait; however, if housing is not immediately available for occupancy, you will be placed on the housing wait list immediately upon establishing your eligibility for housing. Eligibility cannot be established without a complete application package provided to the HSC. Generally, your departure date serves as your control date for placement on the wait list

 

Q:  If I want to request a specific house or housing location and another house is or becomes available that meets my bedroom eligibility; will I lose my Temporary Lodging Allowance (TLA) if I turn it down?

A: Yes. Upon reporting to the new duty station, service members are generally entitled to compensation for temporary lodging.  Where the Housing Authority allows members to select specific housing areas, the member is advised that if available housing at another site meets the member’s bedroom eligibility entitlements, the member’s eligibility for the TLA will terminate. Please check with your local information for location specific information.

 

Q:  What is the effective date (control date) of my application?

A: The control date is set as follows:

  • Military Member:  The control date will be the date of detachment from the last permanent duty station. 
  • Civilian Employees:  The control date is the effective date of transfer as shown on the Notification of Personnel Action (SF50)
  • Military Members with equal bedroom entitlement and the same control date: In cases of service members of equal grade and date of rank applying for housing at the same time, the service member with the greatest length of service will precede the other on the waiting list.  When service members are of unequal grade, the more senior service member will take precedence

 

Q:  Will I be assigned to housing that is less than what I am authorized?

A: Service members will not normally be involuntarily assigned to housing at less than assignment criteria for their pay grade except when military necessity is declared in writing by the Commanding Officer of the installation.  You can request a house that is less than what is authorized as long as you sign an acknowledgement that you are voluntarily accepting less than what you are authorized and that you understand you will not be moved to other housing at a later date.  Subsequently, if your bedroom requirement increases, you may apply to be placed on the wait list for the appropriate bedroom entitlement.

 

Q:  I am interested in family housing but am unable to move into it at this time.  Can I request a delay in my assignment without jeopardizing my place on the wait list?

A: If you apply for housing and have given the Housing Service Center (HSC) sufficient advance notice of an inability to accept family housing until on or after a specified future date, you will not be offered a unit before that date.  This will not adversely affect your position on the wait list.  However, you will not normally be allowed to maintain your place on the wait list longer than one year after reporting, or longer than the expiration of an initial (year) lease.     

 

Q:  How can I accept or decline Navy Housing (government owned or managed) and privatized/PPVhousing while I'm deployed?

A: There are two ways to accept or decline housing offers:

  • Give your spouse or a friend Power of Attorney before deploying and make sure the Housing Service Center (HSC) has the designated person's phone number, and they know the unit of your choice. Power of Attorney can be done at the Naval Legal Services Office (NLSO).
  •  Ask the HSC to send a message to you if your spouse is not here. You will have 24 working hours to respond to this message.

 

If you would like your name to be placed on the waiting list "on hold," please give the HSC a memo stating so before you deploy.

 

Q:  Hawaii/OCONUS installations will not put me on a wait list until I show up in person.  Is this allowed?

A: Yes.  For OCONUS installations, Navy Housing is responsible for validating temporary lodging allowance (TLA) to your Personnel Support Detachment (PSD).  These installations require an in-person visit to provide information about local TLA policies and to teach you about community housing leasing procedures, regulations, and requirements should military housing be unavailable.  This process was put in place to ensure your compliance with these important requirements.

 

Q:  How long will I be on a wait list?

A: You will be advised of approximate/estimated wait times, based upon historical information and anticipated change of station dates of current residents when submitting your complete application. These times are based on our best planning, but are NOT a guarantee; do not plan according to those estimates.  Contact the local Housing Service Center (HSC) for more detailed information and current wait times. You should also ensure that the HSC has your current contact information if you have made any changes since you submitted your application.

 

Q:  How do I request a particular neighborhood’s wait list?

A: You will need to speak with your local Navy Housing Service Center (HSC).  Wait lists vary by installation, and some allow for specific neighborhood wait lists, others do not and instead offer the first available military house.

 

Q:  Navy Housing called and said that military housing just became available for me, but I’m in a community lease and can’t move until later.  Will I have to start over on the wait list?

A: No.  Navy Housing accepts deferrals of military housing.  We will maintain you on the wait list in the same position but not offer you a home until your deferral date arrives.  It is important to communicate regularly with the local Housing Service Center (HSC)  in case there are any changes to your availability so they can serve you properly.

 

Q:  What happens if my eligibility changes while I’m on the wait list?

A: If your eligibility changes while on a wait list, the original control date will continue to be used in instances when you will be placed on another wait list, such as: promotion or frocking resulting in eligibility for a higher grade category of housing, a change in priority status, or change of eligibility for number of bedrooms. If the control date would place your name in the freeze zone on the new wait list, then you will be placed immediately below the freeze zone.

 

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